Your Rainforest Mind

Support for the Excessively Curious, Creative, Smart & Sensitive


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“…Complicated, Confounded, and Chaoticized…” — Living With Gifted Minds

photo from Tom Clynes, author

photo from Tom Clynes, author

“Since the first moment of his existence, Taylor has complicated, confounded, and chaoticized nearly every detail of his family’s lives.”

This is one of my favorite sentences from Tom Clynes’ book, The Boy Who Played with Fusion: Extreme Science, Extreme Parenting, and How to Make a Star.

My favorite paragraph from Clynes’ book is: “Waiting was the most common response when Tracy Cross of the College of William and Mary asked thirteen thousand kids in seven states to describe in one word their experience as gifted children. ‘ They said they were always waiting for teachers to move ahead, waiting for classmates to catch up, waiting to learn something new –always waiting.’ ”

The Boy Who Played With Fusion is not only a captivating true story about a profoundly gifted boy but also an important book if you’re an advocate for gifted children. You can find out more about Tom’s book in my review here. And, in case you haven’t seen it, my popular post about gifted kids and waiting, is here.

Whether you’re a parent of a gifted child or dealing with your own rainforest-minded soul, there are lots of complications, confoundations and chaotizations. Am I right?

And just in the nick of time, before you’re chaoticized beyond all hope, my book will be out at the end of this month, June 2016. And, if my delightful blogginess hasn’t convinced you to buy it, here is the assessment from the aforementioned Tom Clynes, who has seen a prepublication copy:

“The rainforest is Paula Prober’s fresh and apt metaphor for the abundant internal ecosystem of the gifted child or adult. Like tropical forests around the world, the gifted are both fragile and powerful, surrounded by threats but full of world-changing potential.

Prober does not settle for shallow or simplistic answers; she explores and finds inspiration in places that other researchers and practitioners haven’t considered. Drawing on examples from her clinical practice, she presents straightforward strategies for encouraging not just accomplishment, but also the capacity for happiness and fulfillment. The result is an intensely readable and useful book that will resonate with anyone concerned with understanding and nurturing the extraordinary abundance within ourselves and the gifted people in our lives.”

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To my patient bloggEEs: I hope you’re tolerating my book promotion enthusiasm. I promise to continue to provide important content here on my blog as we continue on this journey together. Thank you so much for your support and encouragement.

And speaking of promotion, the lovely Linda K. Silverman of the Gifted Development Center in Denver wrote this review.

And one more thing: I’m giving a talk through the Intergifted site on July 12 (2016). It’s free and you’ll be able to see what I look like and sound like after all of this time wondering how old I really am and if I’m as funny “in person.” The details are here.