Your Rainforest Mind

Support For The Excessively Curious, Creative, Smart & Sensitive

Overexcitabilities — Can’t Live With Them, Can’t Live Without Them

54 Comments

photo-1429080590828-d775fa4a893c

photo from Azrul Aziz, Unsplash

Overexcitabilities. Those pesky little traits that make your friends roll their eyes, relatives recommend medication and neighbors head home early. Maybe you talk fast and often about your passion for stackable brain specimen coasters. Maybe you cry over the Facebook video of the adorable four year old telling his mother why he must become a vegetarian. Maybe you can imagine 100s of ways your child could be abducted by aliens on a Sunday afternoon. Maybe you can’t sleep because the room is too hot, the sheets are too rough and the gentle breeze is too loud.

Life in the rainforest mind is intense. You may feel like too much on so many levels. Too emotional. Too sensitive. Too analytical. Too verbal. Too enthusiastic. Too idealistic. Too curious. Too smart.

And if you’re a male, well, this too muchness can be particularly humiliating if you’re trying to “man up” or “not be a sissy” or impress your former-high-school-football-star-race-car-driving-ex-Marine boss.

What, then, can you do? Are you supposed to shrink? Dumb down? Toughen up? Become a football-star-race-car-driving-Marine?

Hell, no.

Instead:

  • Understand that you aren’t too much. You’re gifted. Your emotions and sensitivities are as vast as your intellect. This can feel overwhelming to others and to yourself.
  • Learn the difference between repressing your emotions and containing them. Decide where it’s safe to be fully yourself and where it’s not. Then, practice ways to gently contain your intensity– through mindfulness meditation, deep breathing, exercise, visualizing an actual container, or writing– when needed.
  • Find people with whom you can geek out: book groups, meetup groups, university classes, conferences, mountain bikers, chess clubs, hikers, art-makers, etc.
  • Practice self-soothing techniques to calm your nervous system and your anxiety especially if some of your intensity comes from painful childhood experiences. You may also need these techniques if your empathy is running amok, which it probably is.
  • Use your sensitivities in your job or at home to understand your colleagues/children, create a more compassionate climate, gain insight, and solve problems more holistically.
  • Imagine how the world would be a better place if more people were deeply sensitive and empathetic. Be a role model for the children. Your too muchness is a strength, not a weakness.

And finally:

Instead of shrinking, get larger. You heard me. Go more deeply into your heart and feel yourself expand. Get as large as the universe. Feel your connection to all things. Let that connection hold you and love you. Become the Universe.

Then, go out and buy those stackable brain specimen coasters.

___________________________

To my dear bloggEEs: How do you cope with your intensity, your emotions, and your sensitivities? How might you see them as strengths? (If you’d like a more detailed post on this topic, click here. Caitlin F. Curley’s blog post includes great ideas plus ideas for helping your sensitive, excitable kids.)

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Author: Paula Prober

I'm a psychotherapist in private practice in Eugene, Oregon. I specialize in counseling gifted adults and consulting with parents of gifted children. The label "gifted" is often controversial and confusing. I use the metaphor of the rain forest to describe this population. Like the rain forest, these individuals are quite complex, highly sensitive, intense, multi-layered, and misunderstood. They're also curious, idealistic, highly intelligent, creative, perfectionistic, and they love learning. I've been an adjunct instructor at the University of Oregon and a guest presenter at Oregon State University and Pacific University. I've written articles on giftedness for the Eugene Register-Guard, the Psychotherapy Networker, and Advanced Development Journal. My book, Your Rainforest Mind: A Guide to the Well-Being of Gifted Adults and Youth, was released in June 2016 by GHF Press and is available on Amazon or at your independent bookstore.

54 thoughts on “Overexcitabilities — Can’t Live With Them, Can’t Live Without Them

  1. I needed this today! Thank you. I was just told I talk too fast by family at a dinner last week and I was so surprised, I thought I’d slowed down so much, and it wasn’t like I had a lot to say either! With an entire house full of rainforests, I think we all need this, especially this time of year when it all seems to be overwhelming to us and everyone around us.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Great advice, beautifully written. You capture the essence of it.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Reblogged this on Ro on a journey and commented:
    Beautiful words from Paula Prober. We don’t need to crush our sensitivity. There are self-compassionate ways to relate with it (that will likely help us better relate with the sensitivity of others, too).

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Paula wrote this post at my request (and possibly requests from other people). My OEs are probably my biggest challenge at this point in my life.

    As an I.T. professional, I daily deal with frustrated people. It seems that normal people and technology are apparently sworn enemies. I frequently have people rush into my office “with their hair on fire.” Meaning that they think they have an emergency that is worthy of a National Guard deployment. And I better be able to fix it, and it’s probably my fault that they had the trouble in the first place. I can feel their negative energy before they even get to my office door.

    I find myself constantly bottling my emotional response and doing my damnedest to hide it from others. I seem to be doing pretty well, because I’ve quietly asked friends and they seem to think I’m doing okay. Although occasionally when my emotions slip out, I find myself in the HR office.

    Regina Hellinger says, “For many gifted individuals it is their emotional overexcitabilities that are the source of their greatest vulnerabilities.” (http://sengifted.org/archives/articles/the-gift-of-emotional-overexcitabilities). Unfortunately, Hillinger recommends that we just “acknowledge and nurture” our sensitivity – perhaps she meant our emotional OE (paragraph 4 of her page). While this might be okay for a 6-year-old, it is definitely not good advice for those of us that are trying to keep our jobs.

    I do everything I can to manage my OEs.
    1. I have taken a lower-pay (and usually) lower-stress job – and one that gives me more satisfaction.
    2. I live in the mountains and commune with nature every chance I get
    3. I nurture my many many hobbies which include the arts
    4. I am part of a novelist group, a technology group, and a music band
    5. I try to be in tune with my OEs, and limit my sensory input when necessary
    6. I have read stacks of books and articles on the subject

    But even with all this, I still have many days when the little “intensity guy” in my head is rattling at the bars of his cage screaming to get out. It is in these moments when I am being forced to press through my OEs and remain professional, that I find myself coming off the rails.

    So how do I deal with my intensity, sensitivity, and my emotions? Well, some days I do great – I can conquer the world. Other days I just kind-of muddle along and do the best I can. Then there are the horrible days, when I know that I’ve unwittingly offended half the world by violating some stupid unwritten social rule – or maybe “the wheels have come off my toys” because I’ve absorbed somebody’s anxiety and then bad things happen.

    I have not yet been able to find the “magic bullet” that will harness the OEs. When I have a computer-user that’s standing in front of me, red in the face and spouting profanities about a technology problem, then I find myself on the verge of meltdown myself. Indeed, my emotional OE is my biggest vulnerability.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Yes, Ed, I had you and others in mind when I wrote this. I didn’t know the nature of your job, though!! Oh boy. It sounds so hard. People get so panicky when their computers aren’t working. No wonder you want to freak out! Of course you do! This is a great list of things to do and readers will benefit from your ideas and will empathize with your experience, I’m sure. I’m sorry I don’t have more to suggest or a “magic bullet.” Have you looked into the mindfulness literature? It could be that if you start a meditation practice that, over time, you could calm the “intensity guy.” Maybe that and a punching bag?? Thanks for reading and for sharing your thoughts. I hope we get some comments that will help.

      Like

      • Thanks Paula. I am a religious man, but having tried multiple meditation techniques I have given up on that particular stream. I can’t make the little guy inside my head calm down enough. Instead, I find that burying myself in an art project, an intellectual pursuit, or a good novel are tools that I use to calm myself. Watching nature (deer, elk, squirrels, etc.) is critical to my emotional health. I’m not sure of these tools are dissociation, or if they are what I need to do to survive. But I know that without them I’m a mess.

        So to answer your question, no I do not meditate, and no I have not looked at that particular literature. When I try to meditate, I just can’t get the little intensity guy in my head to shut up and it makes me even more anxious and frustrated. But thank you for your idea.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Hi Ed, for what it’s worth – that little guy in your head doesn’t have to shut up in order for you to meditate. It’s often referred to as the ‘monkey mind’ as is a normal part of the human condition. It’s our relationship to the monkey mind that changes over time. It can do it’s hooting and hollering, without us getting so caught up in it. That said, meditation is not for everyone and it seems you’ve found your own ways of finding peace.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Thanks for this clarification, Ro. I’ve run into a number of gifted folks who have trouble with meditation because there’s so much thinking going on. But I do explain to them that it’s not about stopping the thoughts but it’s about coming back to the breath once you realize you’re back in monkey mind.

            Liked by 1 person

        • Ed. It looks like you’ve gotten some great responses from readers. I hope they’re helpful. (and I don’t think your calming strategies are dissociation– they’re great tools!)

          Like

    • Ed, back up a second. Aggressive behavior is aggressive behavior. If one of your IT consumers walked into your office and took a swing at you, you’d certainly expect HR to back you up in defending yourself from harm. Verbal and emotional bullying is also something that you should be able to expect firm backing from HR. So these people who come in “with their hair on fire” are in the wrong — if, as you say, they are “standing in front of you, red in the face and spouting profanities about a technology problem.”

      If your HR department is telling you that you were hired to be a punching bag, you might want to consider a different place of employment. This has nothing to do with giftedness, overexcitabilities, or magic bullets — it has to do with an employer that allows (and perhaps even encourages) bullying.

      So you might want to reconsider whether this is your problem of being over-excitable, or is instead a serious and toxic environmental problem. What you’ve described strikes me as the latter.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Just for reference, I’m a software developer. But during a particularly bad patch of life — a divorce — I told my then-employer that I simply could not keep my mind on development, and wanted to switch to customer phone service for a while. That might strike people as an odd choice, but I found it a lot less stressful: you had a pile of complaints to sort through, and a set procedure, and since I’d developed most of the code the customers were complaining about, troubleshooting wasn’t hard work. It was a small company, and I wasn’t in competition with anyone for call handling.

    One thing I did insist on was civility, and I had only a couple of callers who got out of hand. I put them on a blacklist and refused to deal with them — they got written up in my docs, and bounced to upper management. When a CEO or VP calls back a customer and gets an earful of profanities and personal abuse, it’s generally followed by another phone call that tends to put the abuser on the unemployment rolls.

    That’s what HR backing looks like. You have a right to EXPECT civility.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The problem is not other people, the problem is ME. I absorb the emotions of everybody around me, then my OE amplifies everything. OE management does not solve the problem. Somewhere out there is the answer on how to turn OFF the OE/HSP/Empath thing.

      Liked by 2 people

      • I’m not sure about turning it OFF, Ed. But getting help, definitely. Have you gone the route of working with an empath?? Reading books by Judith Orloff, for example? Or seeing someone with those skills? Some people are put off by the idea of strong empathic or psychic abilities. But I know of people who clearly have a “sixth sense.” These people have ways of protecting themselves from “assault” because they’re so sensitive to other people’s energies. This might be an avenue for you?

        Like

        • I had not heard of Judith Orloff. That one will go to the top of my reading list. I finally found an audio book by Karla McLaren “Language of Emotions” that I’ve listened to over and over. There is a lot of good stuff in Karla’s book. Yes, I have several empathic friends/acquaintances, and although they have much stronger empathic abilities than I have, they do not have the OEs that amplify everything they receive – they seem to be able to manage better than I do. I have not been able to forge the type of relationships with these people where they can mentor me through the challenges. I am comforted to know that there are others out there like me, but that doesn’t help me manage my own stuff. Thanks for the book suggestion – I will definitely check that out.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Oh yes. I’ve heard that Karla McLaren is good. I wonder if some of your empathic friends don’t have the gifted part so they don’t have to deal with the OEs, too. That may be why they manage better. Thanks for sharing all of your thoughts here, Ed. I’m guessing that our discussion will benefit others. If you haven’t already, you might deepen the connection with nature that you already have and see if nature and your religion can give you some guidance. And, if this is complicated at all by trauma or dysfunctional family issues from your past, then, that might be another factor.

            Like

      • Yoga nidra has helped me with this. Calming. It is yogic sleep, a form of meditation. It is done lying down and listening. The body scan helps me the most, and the fact that it is generated from outside of myself rather than within. Look it up on You Tube and try it some time.

        Liked by 2 people

  6. Hello Ed, I really feel for you after reading what you experience at work. My own awareness of how people in professions like yours are regularly mistreated is why I’m very conscious of being friendly and easygoing when I ask for assistance. Trying to restore the balance slightly…
    As to the issue of people coming into your office in a rage; firstly, I think it’s sad that we’re at the point where this kind of behaviour is deemed normal. My initial reaction is that you shouldn’t be required to deal with these out of control people at all. I’m guessing it’s expected that you /will/ deal with them, though.

    I’ll toss a couple of ideas out there – have you learned about active listening? From Wikipedia: “Active listening is a communication technique used in counseling, training and conflict resolution, which requires the listener to feed back what they hear to the speaker, by way of re-stating or paraphrasing what they have heard in their own words, to confirm what they have heard and moreover, to confirm the understanding of both parties.”
    You might already practice active listening in your job. Some people calm down when they feel heard. Some.
    Another idea I had was this: If you can stay calm enough when an angry person walks in, could you gather a pen and paper and say something like ‘OK, I should be able to help you with that. Could you please take a moment and explain what’s going on to me clearly, so I can write down the details and we can work on a solution?’ Sometimes people calm down when required to explain things clearly.
    As a last resort, do you have an exit strategy? I still don’t think you should be required to sit in the room with somebody in there who really just wants a dance-partner for their anger. If you feel you’re being pushed past your limit – perhaps this is when an exit strategy is required. Excuse yourself from the room if you can (with a fabricated excuse at the ready – a realistic one, but one that the other person is least likely to argue with). Then you can both have some time to cool off.
    The book ‘When I say No, I feel Guilty’ might be of some assistance, though you have perhaps read it already. It contains some handy assertiveness techniques. Basically, in order to cope with these angry people, it seems like you need to find a way to create a strong boundary between them and yourself – one that they can smash on and wail against all they like… without it harming you. This is a difficult undertaking for the majority of human beings – let alone somebody with OEs. For what it’s worth it sounds like you are taking really good care of yourself outside of work, and you’re coping relatively well at work under difficult circumstances. So you’re not perfect. None of us are.
    Best wishes Ed. I’m sure others will have good ideas to share. Of course, as Paula also mentioned, I totally recommend mindfulness practice if you haven’t gone down that path yet.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Paula, I love your post so much. (as always!) Especially since my 5yo has just decided to become a vegetarian. 😉 Thank you for wonderful insight and compassion.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. A question… What makes a gifted person’s overexcitabilities different from the sensory processing issues experienced by individuals on the autism spectrum? Or are they pretty much the same thing (i.e. your system overloads and you freak out over things that don’t bother neurotypical people)?

    Liked by 1 person

    • The gifted/polymath actually experience some of the same challenges as the Autistic. There are many resources out there for the Autistic – Autism Speaks may be one of the more well-known. I have a friend that has an Autistic child and have done a lot of study on the subject. I had to answer the question for myself to determine if I was Autistic or not, but I do not meet the criterion for Autism.

      Liked by 3 people

      • I haven’t been tested for anything, but when I look at the criteria for autism, I have some characteristics but not others. I also have some of the symptoms of dyspraxia and some of the symptoms of NVLD (nonverbal learning disability) but not others. Whatever is responsible for my many quirks, I have never been neurotypical.

        Liked by 1 person

    • I’m not the best person to answer this question, Jen, although I will say that there are differences that can be identified. It can be quite confusing, though. There are also people who are 2e or twice-exceptional who are both. If you read Caitlyn’s blog (the link is in this post at the end), she writes about her child who is 2e. Also the people who wrote Bright Not Broken, know a lot about this. http://brightnotbroken.weebly.com. (for people who are “just” gifted, without the other issues, I’d say it’s a lot easier to calm the nervous system and to find ways to work with the OEs and to enjoy the sensitivity and empathy. But it’s still challenging, as you can see from what Ed is describing.)

      Liked by 1 person

  9. This is a wonderful article. This describes me perfectly!

    Liked by 2 people

  10. I think the cruel irony of overexcitabilities is that to most people they appear to be symptoms of anything BUT giftedness, and usually not anything good at that. Even to those who may know that we are gifted, when they are overwhelmed by our OE’s the assumption is often that we just aren’t trying hard enough to not be, well, so much US.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Yes, OEs don’t look like people’s beliefs about what giftedness is supposed to be. Interesting way to say it, Mark. Not trying hard enough not to be yourself!

      Like

      • Thank you. Once again you’ve nailed another post.

        I’d like to know if this resonates with anyone else: other than the aforementioned OE’s, a big reason I still struggle with the concept of being gifted is because a big part of me is rather primitive — I feel most at ease when operating in a more instinctual, spontaneous way. In other words, I often have a hard time coloring within the lines. Which kind of explains why I have always been attracted to intense “counterculture” sports, culture and art (skateboarding, punk rock, horror movies/imagery etc).

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Hello Paula, I really love your post. This part especially:
    “Instead of shrinking, get larger. You heard me. Go more deeply into your heart and feel yourself expand. Get as large as the universe. Feel your connection to all things. Let that connection hold you and love you. Become the Universe.”
    To me, this means embracing and running toward my sensitivity (and perhaps the stuff that hurts) instead of repressing/denying it. By denying my sensitivity I deny who I am – and I am choosing not to live that way anymore.
    Thank you also for the links you shared. Great info there.
    On top of OE’s, my body cannot maintain homeostasis due to a neuro condition. So I also live with swinging and uncomfortable bodily sensations/symptoms every waking minute. How do I cope? Not very well, at times. But I’m learning not to beat myself up about it. For a long time I deadened my sensitivity in order to cope with abuse – but as of 13 months ago I broke free of all that.

    Now I practice mindfulness and meditation and I’m doing what you suggest near the end of your post – I’m going back, walking right into the truth of who I am (sensitivity and all). It feels good. Perhaps the repression and denial ultimately causes more difficulty than it solves. Through the mindfulness practice (and much reading on the topic) I’m picking up skills that are assisting me in finally growing up. I’m learning how to self-soothe.
    Spending time in nature helps me a lot; tension seems to dissipate and I feel refreshed afterwards. Playing music is also essential for me. I can’t get up to play the piano easily, so I play the ukulele as well now. Reading poetry (a new endeavour) is also a refuge. Writing helps me make sense of what’s in my head.
    The most transformative practice I’ve encountered thus far is Metta or loving-kindness meditation. I can’t explain the mechanism, but it is changing my life from the inside out. It’s something a person needs to give a good try in order to understand, I think.
    Best wishes Paula! Thank you so much for sharing your wisdom.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. If you are overexcitable and oversensitive and ‘over’all those other things, go to the tabernacle, sit still, and let your mind dwell over the ultimate master of the universe who was – and is – all that, and much more than you can ever imagine….
    He won’t let you down….

    Liked by 2 people

    • Mary, I share your faith. But right now I am struggling with how a loving Master of the universe would create a person with the HSP/OE/gifted/Empathic traits. Somebody decided to use the label “gifted”, but it is truly a curse. The more I study, the more I realize how truly cursed I am – there seems to be no cure. I am working with my Pastor on this issue, but right now I’m stuck. I just want the curse to go away, but it seems that I will have to live with it the rest of my life. So yes, I feel that He has let me down. I know that at some point I’ll reconcile, and accept how I am created. But for now I’m not there. Not ready yet. Still see myself as being cursed. Still see phrases like “he won’t let you down” to be a trite and rote saying.

      Sorry Paula, you probably didn’t want religion to be a part of your blog. Hope I don’t unleash a torrent of religion bashing comments. I don’t mean this to be religion bashing at all – it’s just what I’m struggling with right now.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dear Ed,
        I am sorry you feel cursed for the way you are. The fact that you struggle and keep on struggling because of the way you were created, Ed, the simple fact that you keep on struggling already implies that you are not cursed. Giving up, surrender would be the real curse. When you consider the suffering and the passion of he who was and is love and nothing but love – in prayer, in thoughts, by the tabernacle, in the rosary or through the eyes of his holy beloving mother – might ease your own suffering and lighten your burden in the long run.
        He calls like a soft summerbreeze:
        ‘Come to me all you who labor and are burdened,
        and I will give you rest.
        Take up my yoke upon you and learn of me,
        for I am meek and humble of heart:
        and you shall find rest to your souls.
        For my yoke is easy and my burden light.’
        Bon courage!

        Thank you Paula for transmitting this message. It comes from all over the Atlantic. And thank you for your blog.

        Liked by 1 person

      • This is fine, Ed. So far, my blog hasn’t brought out any bashers! And I can moderate comments, if it does.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. This is *not* an advertisement.
    One of my more recent discoveries is TRE: Trauma and Tension Relieving Exercises. It helps to sort out what is actual neurological damage due to trauma — both current and past — and tension from everyday life. This technique should be taught and monitored by a professional trained in it. More information can be found at http://traumaprevention.com
    The founder, Dr. David Berceli, treated trauma victims in places like the Middle East and Africa. He noticed that humans all over the world respond to trauma one way until they (we) are around 4 years old. Then the response changes to a different, less effective form.
    I have been practicing TRE for a month now, to help to release childhood abuse. Being gifted helped me to survive my childhood! Having an interest in art and nature kept me going despite the situation at home. Thank goodness for school, for teachers who wanted to work with a bright little girl. Had these techniques been available to me then, I might not be as physically compromised as I am now.
    I truly appreciate what Ed has to say about OEs and angry clients. During my working years, certain people were the designated scapegoats of the workaday world. Secretaries got blamed for everything that went wrong. Now IT folks are the ones. Although I am willing to bet that secretaries still catch it. LOL
    I learned how to gently but firmly set a boundary with people, letting them know that I was doing my best to work on helping them. It did not always earn me the respect that was deserved. Respect seems sorely lacking in our world today. But it did help me to know that I was not just swallowing stuff from others all day long. In the end, that has its own set of repercussions. I live with those now. I encourage anyone like Ed to do what you need to do to learn how to stop taking in the OEs of others and to shed what has been taken in.
    When we mirror the anger of others, we may look Type A but really, we reach saturation point and cannot absorb any longer!
    For me now,OEs seem to me to be attached to energy. As my energy has depleted, so has my level of OEs. I’d love to have some of them back. 🙂 Yoga nidra is also helpful to me. I mentioned that above.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. Wait, the examples listed in the first paragraph are examples of overexcitabilities? I thought normal people experienced that!

    Liked by 2 people

    • I suspect that “normal people” experience some of these things some of the time. Just to a lesser degree, a lesser level of intensity. There’s more on OEs if you click on the link at the beginning of the post. (Normal people probably also like stackable brain specimen coasters…) 🙂

      Like

  15. I read this and the readers comments and just want to cry. There are others that experience what I do. I describe it to my husband as extra wires that I have that allows me to “see”, and “feel”, too much that I wish I wouldn’t have. It is extraordinarily overwhelming and painful to me. Many times so beautiful. I can feel a room when I enter it, I can see when someone is not truthful, or fake, I can feel their judgment and thoughts, I can feel their pain or frustrations. I can also see the beauty of the many souls I meet and want to hug them all, but then I have to refrain myself constantly because people wouldn’t understand, or I would be too vulnerable. Always trying to balance and curve my enthusiasm. One thing I’m grateful for is that allows me to see the beauty of my child to an extent that I feel my heart is going to explode in love. When I look at him I see it ALL, and I pray in gratitude for this gift of life I have been given to nurture, protect and guide into the world. I live in this intensity daily and wouldn’t dare to share my feelings with anyone, because none understands it or care too much to understand. They live in what I perceive as blissful unawareness.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you for sharing, Diana. You’ve described it so well. The overwhelming pain and the beauty, your heart exploding with love. I’m glad you’re here with us. We understand.

      Like

    • I hear you about parenting with OEs, Diana. When I say that every day I am deeply thankful that I had my daughter before I became unwell… I mean that literally, multiple times every day, I stop and give thanks for having my daughter in my life. Every time my husband and daughter go out the door I bid them farewell, conscious that it might be our last goodbye – because almost anything can happen at any time (but I’m careful not to give off a wistful/clinging vibe). My daughter (who wants to become a globe-trotting professional drummer and actress; two things which her teachers/mentors have said are realistically possible) has inherited my neuro disorder but we have no way of knowing if she’ll ever become seriously physically restricted by it. I can’t tell you all the emotions I have swirling around that issue. Ah, parenting with OEs. It’s a trip. Marriage, too.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Thank you all for sharing this. Have anyone read about Dabrowski and his positive disintegration? http://giftedkids.about.com/od/socialemotionalissues/p/positive_dis.htm.
    I compare “Instead of shrinking, get larger. You heard me. Go more deeply into your heart and feel yourself expand. Get as large as the universe. Feel your connection to all things. Let that connection hold you and love you. Become the Universe.” with jumping to the next level in this Dabrowski theory.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Pingback: Intense Kids, Intense Parents — Tips for Managing the Mayhem | Your Rainforest Mind

  18. Pingback: How Can Sensitive Souls Change the World? | Your Rainforest Mind

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s