Your Rainforest Mind

Support For The Excessively Curious, Creative, Smart & Sensitive

Let Your Voice Be Heard–One Shriek At A Time

16 Comments

CC Flickr Rikard Elofsson

CC Flickr Rikard Elofsson

Let your voice be heard.

One shriek at a time.

OK. Maybe shrieking isn’t all that helpful. It may not change the world.

But it’s a start.

Let me explain.

 

You may be shrieking because you’ve heard over and over that you have a lot of potential.

But you can’t find it.

And you’ve looked. Everywhere.

Where the heck is that potential? you ask.

 

You may be shrieking because you’ve heard that you’re supposed to be able to do anything.

Anything that you put your mind to.

And you think, really?

Is that supposed to be a good thing?

 

You may be shrieking because you’ve heard that you don’t have to be perfect.

Just do your best.

And you reflect, just-do-my-best?

Oh, OK, no pressure there.

 

You may be shrieking because you’ve heard that you should lower your standards.

That your high expectations are unreasonable.

And you gulp, what if everyone else raised their standards, instead?

 

You may be shrieking because you’ve heard that your kids are gifted.

Oh no. Really? And you wonder.

Where do they get it?

 

You may be shrieking because you’ve heard that you’re over-reacting.

To injustice, climate change, politics and your neighbor’s leaf blower.

And you sigh, Why isn’t everyone over-reacting?

 

Let your voice be heard.

One shriek at at time.

It’s a start.

___________________________________

To my bloggEEs: After you finish shrieking, your voice will be available for less noisy but just as important purposes. Speaking your truth. Singing your songs. Being your True Self. Doing what you’re here to do. (And let us know in the comments what else you’re shrieking about.)

Oh, and I think you already know this, but in case you don’t, I’m not suggesting that you shriek at people. I’m thinking more– at home alone, in your car, on a deserted island. Or maybe it’s another metaphor. But you get what I’m sayin’, yeah?

This post is part of the website on giftedness, hoagiesgifted.org , blog hop for October (goes live October 1st). To read more blog posts on the topic of advocating for gifted children and adults, the first button will take you to the website blog hop. The second button will take you to the next post in the hop.

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Author: Paula Prober

I'm a psychotherapist in private practice in Eugene, Oregon. I specialize in counseling gifted adults and consulting with parents of gifted children. The label "gifted" is often controversial and confusing. I use the metaphor of the rain forest to describe this population. Like the rain forest, these individuals are quite complex, highly sensitive, intense, multi-layered, and misunderstood. They're also curious, idealistic, highly intelligent, creative, perfectionistic, and they love learning. I've been an adjunct instructor at the University of Oregon and a guest presenter at Oregon State University and Pacific University. I've written articles on giftedness for the Eugene Register-Guard, the Psychotherapy Networker, and Advanced Development Journal. My book, Your Rainforest Mind: A Guide to the Well-Being of Gifted Adults and Youth, was released in June 2016 by GHF Press and is available on Amazon or at your independent bookstore.

16 thoughts on “Let Your Voice Be Heard–One Shriek At A Time

  1. I was not allowed to sing at home, my voice is quite loud. Then I started singing in a choir when I was 23. It was great! I took singing lessons. Now I am 66 and still singing. I love it and listeners too. Although I am an amateur, it is one of my talents I use.
    So I use my voice. It also helps a lot when speaking in public, which I do now often.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This post resonates…quite a lot. It seemed like I was always coming across as too know-it-all or too emotional or too passionate or too something! I tried desperately to tone myself down because all I wanted to do was fit in and be liked as “one of the gang”. It took me decades to realize that I just needed to find my own gang to hang with – that I’d never fit in with the regular gang, no matter how hard I tried.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. “You may be shrieking because you’ve heard that your kids are gifted.
    Oh no. Really? And you wonder.
    Where do they get it?”

    I loved that part! I remember that moment so well when my husband and I learned giftedness is likely hereditary. We looked at one another, each pointing our fingers at the other!

    I just love your posts, Paula! You have a special way of bringing out the bright side of giftedness at a time when I’m letting the dark side overtake me! Thank you!

    Liked by 3 people

  4. I enjoy how you tease out a co-existing situation of wanting no pressure, but advocating for system-wide high standards. I will have to sort out if my shrieks are calls for a nap or a battle cry.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. “And you sigh, Why isn’t everyone over-reacting?”

    Yep, all the time!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. The dilemma is that even when we whisper that our children are gifted, others may think we’re shrieking! Maybe, eventually, it won’t seem like shrieking when more parents feel justified in expressing their views. Great points.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Gail. Yes, there’s still such a stigma against parents who are seeking help for their gifted kids. Thankfully, there are therapists out there, like you, educating folks. Keep up the great work!

      Like

  7. You may be shrieking because you’ve heard that you should lower your standards.
    That your high expectations are unreasonable.
    And you gulp, what if everyone else raised their standards, instead?
    ^^^^ THIS ^^^^^ a million times this!

    I’ve wanted this for my kids (and now that I’m in a state with a TAG program, I’m filling out insane paperwork for their new school so they can be tested this year.
    I’ve wanted this for my job, any of them
    I’ve wanted this for everything I do!

    How can we expect a better future if our expectations are so low as to barely maintain the status quo?

    Is it really that hard for everyone else to do these things? — I’m learning the answer is often yes, now that it is my job to recruit, train, and support coaches for youth robotics teams.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Good question. I do think, yes, not everyone is capable of reaching your high expectations. Sure, some folks may be choosing not to but others may not be able to get there, even with lots of effort or practice.

      Like

  8. Thank-you finally I have found peace.. I have a rain-forest mind. It explains everything

    Liked by 1 person

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